For avid fitness buffs and casual gym-goers, owning a fitness tracker is imperative. And what better brand to consider than the one that started it all: Fitbit. With devices that range from the most basic to the decidedly more feature-packed, there’s bound to be a Fitbit that will perfectly suit your needs and budget. Listed below are all the existing models found in Fitbit’s Versa line, each with its corresponding price and specifications: the Fitbit Versa Lite, Fitbit Versa, and Fitbit Versa 2. Save up to $50 when you get them on Amazon today.

Fitbit Versa Lite – $120

The Fitbit Versa Lite is virtually identical to its predecessor, the Fitbit Versa. The only difference is, as its name suggests, the Versa Lite is so lightweight that you’ll barely notice it on your wrist. You should also know, though, that it’s slightly anemic when it comes to features.

Its 1.3-inch LCD display looks crisp and bright and it has one button on the right side for navigation that’s very easy to use. At the back, there is a heart rate monitor and inside it is an accelerometer, an ambient light sensor, and an SPO2 sensor. It comes with a replaceable silicone band that comes in many colors from the shockingly bright to more subdued tones.

This watch doesn’t skimp on its wellness features, even though this is the more affordable version of the Fitbit Versa. There are, however, a few omissions that might prove to be a dealbreaker for many people. With this watch, you can track your exercises, heart rate, steps, sleep, and whether you’re moving each hour. What’s missing is an altimeter to measure elevation, so you won’t be able to determine the number of stairsteps you’ve climbed, and a gyroscope, so you can’t keep tabs on the number of laps you’ve made in the pool. It’s also lacking onboard music storage so you can’t store any MP3s in it.

Thankfully, this watch is capable of smart notifications. You can customize which apps can send notifications to it, as well as when you want to receive them. The interaction between the watch and phone is seamless. Once your phone receives a message, you can count on the watch to display it. You can’t read entire messages though, but just the first few lines.

The Fitbit Versa Lite usually comes with a $160 price tag, but you can get it on Amazon today for $40 less – paying just $120 for it.

Renewed Fitbit Versa – $128

The Fitbit Versa looks almost exactly like an Apple Watch. It is square with chamfered edges and has a 1.3-inch LCD screen. The watch’s size is just right and wouldn’t look gigantic on women nor diminutive on men. Its anodized aluminum watch body is thin and compact, and it comes with a silicone strap that’s breathable so it won’t smother your skin while you work out.

Fitbit has always been laser-focused on activity tracking, and the Versa certainly delivers in that department. At a glance, the dashboard provides you with your daily stats, tabulated into charts on a weekly basis for comparison purposes. You can keep track of more than 15 different types of exercises, as well as your sleep quality and progress. This watch is water-resistant to depths of up to 50 meters, so you can still monitor your vitals in the pool and even while scuba diving. The heart monitor is impressively precise, women can identify recurring irregularities in their menstrual cycle through the Female Health app, and GPS and a gyroscope are built in to track your running, cycling, or climbing pace and direction. You can even receive motivational messages every morning. Don’t worry, you have the option to turn these off if you find them saccharine.

The Versa is powered by Fitbit’s proprietary operating system, Fitbit OS, and is assisted by 4GB of storage. The interface is fairly responsive, though it can experience stuttering when you’re going through lots of notifications. Tap on the screen or flick your wrist to awaken the display so that you can navigate the interface.

Of the 4GB of internal storage, 2.5GB is dedicated to music. You can choose to manually upload songs, or stream music through Pandora or Deezer, both of which have a free one-month trial period. You can also use Spotify on this watch. Unfortunately, you cannot download songs on it even if you have a premium subscription. Transferring songs from your phone to this watch is also a very tedious process. The Versa can receive the usual smart notifications like text, call, email, app alert, and more, and if you’re an Android phone user you’re in luck as you can send out quick replies. Lastly, this watch’s battery life can last roughly three and a half days with normal usage, so you won’t need to charge this every night, unlike an Apple Watch.

Renewed units of the Fitbit Versa are currently on sale on Amazon for just $128.

Fitbit Versa 2 – $150

Just like Fitbit Versa and Versa Lite, the Fitbit Versa 2 looks suspiciously like an Apple Watch. You might even accuse it of being a cheap knock-off, although it isn’t by any means. Despite having almost the same design language as Apple’s bestselling wearable, the Fitbit Versa 2 is a solid and well-crafted smartwatch on its own. However, we do have to mention that its wellness insights come at a cost via a paid Fitbit Premium subscription. This might prove to be a serious impediment to some people, especially data-hungry athletes.

The most notable improvement to the Versa 2 is its AMOLED display. The Versa Lite and Versa’s LCD screens work fine, but an AMOLED display offers deeper blacks and helps mask the Versa 2’s massive bezels. And just like the Apple Watch 5, this smartwatch features always-on display.  Other refinements include a slightly better battery life (three to four days with normal usage), an upgraded processor, and NFC for Fitbit Pay, but we’ll get to that later.

Navigating this smartwatch’s interface is pretty straightforward and easy. Swipe right from the home screen to access apps like exercise, alarm, clock, and third-party apps like Spotify, and pull down from the top for notifications and quick settings. While having Spotify integrated is great, you need to have a premium subscription to be able to use it. Fortunately, the Versa 2 offers onboard music storage of about 300 songs that you can transfer via the desktop Fitbit app.

Alexa debuts on the Versa 2, but it’s not something worth getting excited about. Sure, you can ask Alexa to give you the weather forecast, but asking who the first American president is will only provide you with the correct answer minus any additional information. She also had difficulty understanding our queries so we recommend not using her at all to avoid getting a brain aneurysm.

The Versa 2’s fitness tracking is quite extensive and is wonderfully simple and easy to use. With it you can track steps, calories, heart rate, sleep, and activity minutes, and initiate workouts from seven different exercise modes: running, cycling, swimming, treadmill running, and weight training, as well as a general exercise tracking option and an interval training mode. There’s a vibration prompt at each interval for activity and for rest. Now for the bad part: Some of the insights are quite lacking. For example, if you use it in bed to track your sleep, you’d be provided with a number from zero to 100 together with a one-word description, like “76: Fair”. There’s no context, no explanation. And eventually, the only way to get actionable health insights is through the soon-to-be-launched Fitbit Premium membership which costs $10 a month or $80 annually. Bummer.

The Fitbit Versa 2 usually retails for $200, but right now you can get it on Amazon for just $150 – that’s $50 off.

Looking for more? Check out our curated deals page for more fitness tracker, smartwatch, and Apple Watch deals.

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